Posts Tagged ‘alopecia’

Can you Have a Hair Transplant and Scalp Micropigmentation?

Posted on: June 5th, 2017 by Dr. William Yates

Can you Have a Hair Transplant and Scalp Micropigmentation?

Many women and most men will experience some degree of hair loss throughout their life and in fact, it is believed that 50% of men will have some degree of androgenetic alopecia (male pattern baldness) by the time they turn 50. Since there are so many patients who will want to find a solution for their hair loss, there have been great advances in the hair restoration field throughout the years.

One of the treatments that is becoming more and more popular is scalp micropigmentation. Scalp micropigmentation is a non-surgical hair loss treatment option in which natural pigments are applied at the epidermis level of the scalp in order to replicate the appearance of hair follicles or strands. Scalp micropigmentation delivers very realistic and natural looking results that replicate the natural patterns of any hair you have remaining by applying several layers of pigment and varying the depth and angle of them.

Scalp micropigmentation is a very popular treatment option for both men and women because they are able to get instant results, experience very little pain and have little to no downtime. Even though scalp micropigmentation does not actually restore your hair, it is great at hiding any hair loss you are experiencing.

Another option for those suffering from hair loss is a hair transplant, which is a surgical procedure that is the only permanent solution for hair loss. This procedure will take a few hours and afterwards, there will be a bit of redness, some minor swelling and some scabbing where the hair was transplanted. This will usually clear up within a week.

Many people are opting to combine these treatments in order to reap the benefits that they each offer.

Getting Scalp Micropigmentation Before Having a Hair Transplant Surgery

It is normally recommended that young men do not get a hair transplant surgery until they are older, since their hair loss pattern is not very likely to be well established and it is essential that only permanent hair follicles that are not affected by androgenetic alopecia down the road are transplanted.

However, young men can get scalp micropigmentation and this may be an excellent option for young men who are unhappy with their current state of hair loss and are looking for a solution. If further hair loss occurs, you may need to have another treatment eventually and getting a hair transplant surgery is a viable option since there will not be any damage to your hair follicles or to your scalp.

Getting Scalp Micropigmentation After Having a Hair Transplant Surgery

There are some patients who had a hair transplant years ago and are looking to hide the scars from their surgery. This happens often for men who had the old-fashioned FUT “strip” surgery that left behind long and very apparent scars on the back of their head. Scalp micropigmentation allows for these scars to be camouflaged, which can help to restore self-confidence.

Combining Scalp Micropigmentation and a Hair Transplant

When patients have a hair transplant, there is only a certain amount of follicles that are able to be transplanted and this number can be further reduced if there is only a small donor area. After the hair transplant, scalp micropigmentation can help to enhance the appearance of the hair’s density.

If you would like to learn more about what hair loss treatments would be a good solution for you, you can contact the experienced hair loss physician, Dr. Yates. He will be able to determine what is causing your hair loss and will let you know what your options are for treatment.


Yates Hair Science Group features ARTAS robotics

Posted on: April 24th, 2017 by Dr. William Yates

Yates Hair Science Group is owned and managed by Dr. William Yates, MD, hair loss expert and board-certified hair restoration surgeon. Apart from well-known treatments like Rogaine and Propecia, Yates Hair Science Group also offers non-surgical treatments like laser light and platelet-rich plasma therapy.

 

Yates Hair Science Group focuses solely on hair restoration, scalp micro-pigmentation, and hair styling for thinning hair. Yates Hair Science Group is also one of the few select centers in the world that uses the ARTAS robotic hair transplant system, a machine that uses an algorithm to target robust hairs in their growing stage for extraction and implantation. The procedure is performed under local anesthesia.

 

The hair or follicular units are harvested individually or punched from the back of the scalp. The hairs are then stored in Hypothermosol and ATPv to ensure protection and survival of the grafts until they can be transplanted to the balding area.

 

Yates Hair Science Group is recognized as an ARTAS Center of Clinical Excellence and is frequently sought out by patients from all over the globe. For those who want access to the services of the group, a travel concierge makes the necessary arrangements to make sure patients’ trips, procedures and follow-up care are taken care of.

Alopecia Areata and Your Health

Posted on: April 21st, 2017 by Dr. William Yates

Alopecia Areata and Your Health

Alopecia areata is a common disease which targets hair follicles, usually causing hair to fall out in small, smooth, round quarter-sized patches. It affects over four million people in America. The amount of hair loss experienced depends on the person, and the disease rarely leads to complete hair loss on the affected area, generally on the head, face, or body.
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease which can affect anyone and often reveals itself in childhood. Because autoimmune diseases prevent the body from shielding itself from infection and disease, the immune system begins to attack even the healthy parts of the body. In the case of alopecia, the immune system attacks a person’s hair follicles.

 

There is no way to prevent alopecia from occurring, but there are ways to manage the condition, which you will find below:

 

Alopecia Areata and Your Health

If you have alopecia areata, it is best to make an appointment with your dermatologist to properly diagnose your problem and discuss treatment options. Here is some general information about the disease to consider before seeing your doctor.

 

This disease is not contagious and those affected with alopecia are generally in good health in many other ways. Alopecia areata will not cause you to feel pain, it does not make you feel ill, and it does not prevent you from living a perfectly normal life.

 

However, dealing with hair loss can present its challenges in terms of self-image and confidence. Understanding the disease and reaching out to others with alopecia for support and advice will help you cope with the hair loss while you learn to value yourself and your life regardless of having alopecia areata.

 

Will My Hair Grow Back?

While your hair may grow back, there is also a chance of losing it again. Some people lose more hair than others and some people may never see hair growth, while others have total hair growth over time. Symptoms really vary case-by-case. While there is no cure for this disease, there are medically approved and effective treatments that may help the hair grow back.
Certain medical treatments stimulate hair growth, though they cannot prevent further hair loss or cure the disease. You can contact a hair loss specialist to discuss therapies, such as steroid injections or creams.

 

Coping With Alopecia Areata

There are also some things within your control to reduce discomforts or dangers of hair loss, such as using protective sunscreen on your scalp, face, and other exposed skin, wearing sunglasses to protect yourself from the sun and dust, and wearing hats or scarves to protect your head.

 

What About the Emotional Outcomes of Alopecia?

This disease affects everyone differently, in terms of physical, mental, and emotional impacts. Those affected with alopecia areata can feel completely alone, even isolating close family and friends, leaving everyone feeling helpless and frustrated.

 

Commonly, alopecia areata patients respond to the disease in some of the following ways:
Feeling alone and isolated
Feeling of loss and grief
Guilt, blame, or embarrassment
Worry that others will find out about their disease
Sadness or depression
Hopelessness
Discomfort in having to wear a wig, scarf, or hat
You can cope with the feelings of shame and anger about the disease by understanding that you are not alone. You can learn about the disease and reach out to others for a supportive network.
If that is not enough, many alopecia areata patients find comfort through counseling where they learn to work through their feelings and develop coping skills. You can contact your physician for a referral to a mental health professional.